Soliris® (eculizumab) is the FIRST AND ONLY FDA-approved complement inhibitor indicated for the treatment of adults with anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibody-positive neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD).1

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In the Soliris PREVENT study of patients with anti-AQP4 antibody-positive NMOSD, Soliris was superior to placebo based on time to first adjudicated on-trial relapse (primary endpoint).1

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reduction in risk of relapse in adult patients treated with Soliris compared to placebo (Hazard Ratio=0.058; P<0.0001).1

Click here for PREVENT study design
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SHE IS ONE OF THE 98%

of patients treated with Soliris who were relapse-free at 48 weeks vs 63% with placebo.1,2

STUDY DESIGN1,2
PREVENT (Prevention of Relapses in Neuromyelitis Optica): Phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluating the efficacy and safety of Soliris in patients with anti-AQP4 antibody-positive NMOSD who received Soliris (N=96) or placebo (N=47).

Soliris is an established therapy across multiple indications

12 years of postmarket experience
12 years of postmarket experience
12 years of postmarket experience
12 years of postmarket experience

NMOSD and Soliris

Risk of Relapse Image

NMOSD relapses are unpredictable and tend to be severe and recurrent5-7

Over time, relapses have been shown to be inevitable for the majority of patients with NMOSD.5,6,8

Risk of Relapse
Efficacy

Soliris was studied in PREVENT for over 3 years in patients with anti-AQP4 antibody-positive NMOSD

Learn more about the 3+ year PREVENT study.1,2

Efficacy and Safety

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IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION & INDICATION FOR SOLIRIS® (eculizumab), INCLUDING BOXED WARNING

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WARNING: SERIOUS MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS

Life-threatening and fatal meningococcal infections have occurred in patients treated with Soliris and may become rapidly life-threatening or fatal if not recognized and treated early.

  • Comply with the most current Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendations for meningococcal vaccination in patients with complement deficiencies.
  • Immunize patients with meningococcal vaccines at least 2 weeks prior to administering the first dose of Soliris, unless the risks of delaying Soliris therapy outweigh the risk of developing a meningococcal infection. (See Serious Meningococcal Infections for additional guidance on the management of the risk of meningococcal infection).
  • Vaccination reduces, but does not eliminate, the risk of meningococcal infections. Monitor patients for early signs of meningococcal infections and evaluate immediately if infection is suspected.

Soliris is available only through a restricted program under a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS). Under the Soliris REMS, prescribers must enroll in the program. Enrollment in the Soliris REMS program and additional information are available by telephone: 1-888-SOLIRIS (1-888-765-4747) or at www.solirisrems.com.

Contraindications
  • Patients with unresolved serious Neisseria meningitidis infection
  • Patients who are not currently vaccinated against Neisseria meningitidis, unless the risks of delaying Soliris treatment outweigh the risks of developing a meningococcal infection
Warnings and Precautions
Serious Meningococcal Infections
Risk and Prevention

The use of Soliris increases a patient’s susceptibility to serious meningococcal infections (septicemia and/or meningitis). 

Vaccinate or revaccinate for meningococcal disease according to the most current ACIP recommendations for patients with complement deficiencies. Immunize patients without a history of meningococcal vaccination at least 2 weeks prior to receiving the first dose of Soliris. If Soliris must be initiated immediately in an unvaccinated patient, administer meningococcal vaccine(s) as soon as possible and provide 2 weeks of antibacterial drug prophylaxis. Discontinue Soliris in patients who are undergoing treatment for serious meningococcal infections.

REMS

Prescribers must counsel patients about the risk of meningococcal infection, provide the patients with the REMS educational materials, and ensure patients are vaccinated with meningococcal vaccine(s).

Other Infections

Serious infections with Neisseria species (other than N. meningitidis), including disseminated gonococcal infections, have been reported.

Patients may have increased susceptibility to infections, especially with encapsulated bacteria. Additionally, Aspergillus infections have occurred in immunocompromised and neutropenic patients. Use caution when administering Soliris to patients with any systemic infection.

Infusion Reactions

Administration of Soliris may result in infusion reactions, including anaphylaxis or other hypersensitivity reactions. Interrupt Soliris infusion and institute appropriate supportive measures if signs of cardiovascular instability or respiratory compromise occur. 

Adverse Reactions

The most frequently reported adverse reactions in the NMOSD placebo-controlled trial (≥10%) are: upper respiratory infection, nasopharyngitis, diarrhea, back pain, dizziness, influenza, arthralgia, pharyngitis, and contusion.

INDICATION

Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder (NMOSD)
Soliris is indicated for the treatment of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) in adult patients who are anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibody positive.

Please see full Prescribing Information for Soliris, including Boxed WARNING regarding serious meningococcal infections.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION & INDICATION FOR SOLIRIS® (eculizumab), INCLUDING BOXED WARNING
WARNING: SERIOUS MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS

Life-threatening and fatal meningococcal infections have occurred in patients treated with Soliris and may become rapidly life-threatening or fatal if not recognized and treated early.

  • Comply with the most current Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendations for meningococcal vaccination in patients with complement deficiencies.
  • Immunize patients with meningococcal vaccines at least 2 weeks prior to administering the first dose of Soliris, unless the risks of delaying Soliris therapy outweigh the risk of developing a meningococcal infection. (See Serious Meningococcal Infections for additional guidance on the management of the risk of meningococcal infection).
  • Vaccination reduces, but does not eliminate, the risk of meningococcal infections. Monitor patients for early signs of meningococcal infections and evaluate immediately if infection is suspected.

Soliris is available only through a restricted program under a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS). Under the Soliris REMS, prescribers must enroll in the program. Enrollment in the Soliris REMS program and additional information are available by telephone: 1-888-SOLIRIS (1-888-765-4747) or at www.solirisrems.com.

Contraindications
  • Patients with unresolved serious Neisseria meningitidis infection
  • Patients who are not currently vaccinated against Neisseria meningitidis, unless the risks of delaying Soliris treatment outweigh the risks of developing a meningococcal infection
Warnings and Precautions
Serious Meningococcal Infections
Risk and Prevention

The use of Soliris increases a patient’s susceptibility to serious meningococcal infections (septicemia and/or meningitis). 

Vaccinate or revaccinate for meningococcal disease according to the most current ACIP recommendations for patients with complement deficiencies. Immunize patients without a history of meningococcal vaccination at least 2 weeks prior to receiving the first dose of Soliris. If Soliris must be initiated immediately in an unvaccinated patient, administer meningococcal vaccine(s) as soon as possible and provide 2 weeks of antibacterial drug prophylaxis. Discontinue Soliris in patients who are undergoing treatment for serious meningococcal infections.

REMS

Prescribers must counsel patients about the risk of meningococcal infection, provide the patients with the REMS educational materials, and ensure patients are vaccinated with meningococcal vaccine(s).

Other Infections

Serious infections with Neisseria species (other than N. meningitidis), including disseminated gonococcal infections, have been reported.

Patients may have increased susceptibility to infections, especially with encapsulated bacteria. Additionally, Aspergillus infections have occurred in immunocompromised and neutropenic patients. Use caution when administering Soliris to patients with any systemic infection.

Infusion Reactions

Administration of Soliris may result in infusion reactions, including anaphylaxis or other hypersensitivity reactions. Interrupt Soliris infusion and institute appropriate supportive measures if signs of cardiovascular instability or respiratory compromise occur. 

Adverse Reactions

The most frequently reported adverse reactions in the NMOSD placebo-controlled trial (≥10%) are: upper respiratory infection, nasopharyngitis, diarrhea, back pain, dizziness, influenza, arthralgia, pharyngitis, and contusion.

INDICATION

Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder (NMOSD)
Soliris is indicated for the treatment of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) in adult patients who are anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibody positive.

Please see full Prescribing Information for Soliris, including Boxed WARNING regarding serious meningococcal infections.

References
1. Soliris [package insert]. Boston, MA: Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 2. Pittock SJ, Berthele A, Fujihara K, et al. Eculizumab in aquaporin-4–positive neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. N Engl J Med. 2019;381(7):614‑625. 3. Data on file. Periodic benefit-risk evaluation report. Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 2017. 4. ClinicalTrials.gov. US National Library of Medicine. Accessed January 15, 2020. 5. Jarius S, Ruprecht K, Wildemann B, et al. Contrasting disease patterns in seropositive and seronegative neuromyelitis optica: a multicentre study of 175 patients. J Neuroinflammation. 2012;9:14. 6. Wingerchuk DM, Hogancamp WF, O’Brien PC, Weinshenker BG. The clinical course of neuromyelitis optica (Devic’s syndrome). Neurology. 1999;53(5):1107-1114. 7. Kitley J, Leite MI, Nakashima I, et al. Prognostic factors and disease course in aquaporin-4 antibody-positive patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder from the United Kingdom and Japan. Brain. 2012;135(pt 6):1834-1849. 8. Mealy MA, Wingerchuk DM, Greenberg BM, Levy M. Epidemiology of neuromyelitis optica in the United States: a multicenter analysis. Arch Neurol. 2012;69(9):1176-1180.